The Darn Thing Always Comes Back To Organization

Seems to me that being a writer is harder than at any other time in history.

Obviously I wasn’t around when Homer, Shakespeare, Hemingway, Dickens, Verne, or Twain were writing their masterpieces, and I admit that their lives were not easy.

Then there were the ladies:  Austen (who didn’t become famous until after she died), or Woolf (whose personal life was more hellish than her writing).

Christie did alright though – her personal life suffered pretty normal life situations (death of loved ones, a nasty divorce) – but she became a successful author by time she was 30, her second marriage was happy, and she lived a long life.

The reason I think past authors had it “easier” (I use this word loosely), is because they didn’t have to be author, publisher, and marketer all in one.  Nowadays, as I’ve stated before, we writers are responsible for all these roles whether we are self-published or traditionally published.

And somehow, it always comes down to that darn organization word!

Every day, and many a sleepless night, I think things like: Gotta get the ending to that story written.  Then I remember that I wrote the ending notes on a piece of paper that I threw in a pile of other writing notes to be filed.

Darn!

I’ll have to dig through the whole pile in order to write that task off my list, so I put writing “that ending” on the back burner until tomorrow.

My mind still races… I need to tweet my latest review.  But before I do that, I wanted to be sure and download TweetDeck, to maximize my tweet potential.

I decide I need to revise the latest draft of one of my blog posts, to include the reference at the bottom.  Sure don’t want to have any problems with copyright infringement!  Now where did I put that book?

Speaking of, I plan on going back and revising the copyright information on a story I published, but first I have to find the sample copy I received.  I’m pretty sure it was on my desk last week, before I cleaned the desk to make room for that joint project I did.

Like many writers, I am always making notes on napkins in restaurants or the backs of envelopes.  Inspiration knows no time clock.  It doesn’t matter if you’re sitting in front of your computer or having dinner with family.

When the words come… the words come.

So if all I had to do was write, developing plot lines and striving for “In Media Res” (http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2014/04/23/starting-the-story-in-the-action-understanding-in-medias-res/), it would be challenge enough.

Add keeping track of all the additional details associated with marketing, software, publishing platforms, etc. etc…. and it becomes a home office nightmare.  Geez.

Being a writer today depends as much on your organizational skills as it does anything else.  This is bad news for me, as I have always been organizationally challenged (aka: messy, but I prefer to think of myself as “spontaneous”).

Did writers from days gone by need to obsess over these details?  I think not.

Now, if you’ll excuse me – having got that out of my system – I need to go find that story ending….

 

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About Cary Area Writer's Group (CAWG)

Who Are We? We are a group who live, meet, and support each other in Cary, Illinois. Writers… that is what we call ourselves, but we are so much more than that. We have full time jobs, full time kids and full time hassles like anyone else. We don’t come up with stories. we live them. The only thing different about us is that we write them down. We don’t sleep. We have deadlines that are constantly looming and we always hope for that elusive quiet that never quite finds its way to our lives. If you think you can keep up with this pace, if you can put down the phone long enough to write a sentence or two and make sense, well I’m sorry to say you’re a writer and I know what you’re going through. Stick to it. Publication is just around the corner and then you can sit down. Or can you? It’s all in a day’s work but you know you wouldn’t trade it in. It’s who you are. By Grace Rellie
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